The LEED Debate: Do LEED-Certified Green Buildings Protect Human Health?

 

EHHI's Concerns about LEED-Certified Green Buildings and Human Health
EHHI's report shows that the criteria used for determining LEED certification largely ignore factors relating to human health, particularly the use of potentially toxic building materials. Energy-efficient buildings may increase concentrations of hazardous chemicals indoors, posing unnecessary risks to human health. EHHI is especially concerned that the LEED program provides the false impression that the buildings it certifies protect human health from environmental hazards. Click here to read EHHI's press release.


LEED Building Standards Fail to Protect Human Health
LEED certification has emerged as the green standard of approval for new buildings in the United States. But the criteria used for determining the ratings largely ignore factors relating to human health, particularly the use of potentially toxic building materials. LEED is now the most widely adopted green building certification program in the country, with architects and developers striving to earn LEED’s coveted platinum or gold rating, and an increasing number of local, state, and federal regulations beginning to incorporate LEED standards into official building codes. Click to read the article by EHHI Board Member John Wargo, PhD, in Yale Environment 360.




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EHHI's LEED Report


The LEED program — Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design — is playing an increasingly important role in the drive to make buildings in the United States greener and more energy efficient.

LEED certification has emerged as the green standard of approval for new buildings in the United States. But the criteria used for determining the ratings largely ignore factors relating to human health, particularly the use of potentially toxic building materials..


For further information about pesticides in private drinking water wells, download EHHI's report or click here for more on EHHI.